Archives: Found Objects 2016

2016 Found Object Poem Project: Wrap Up

PF tag

It’s Poetry Friday! Found Object Poet Linda Baie is hosting this week’s poetry links at Teacher Dance.

Happy Poetry Friday, everyone. Today, I’m wrapping up the annual daily write-in project.

In January, I invited everyone to join me for a month-long project, writing in response to found objects (the original post is here). This is the fourth time I’ve celebrated my February birthday with a daily project that gives back to the writing community.

In 2013, I sent original postcard poems to 44 friends. In 2014, Author Amok turned into a poetic version of a Color Run, with poets doused in all the shades of the rainbow for writing inspiration.

And for 2015, we wrote a poem for every day in February in response to sound clips.

This year’s theme was FOUND OBJECTS. Thanks to everyone who sent in objects for us to use as prompts! We wrote about 29 objects from a variety of categories: Toys, Food, Functional Objects, Art, Antiques, Nature, and Signs.

I was unprepared for the amazing response our project had this year. Here are the numbers.

2014’s Pantone Poem Project: 14 poets, 144 poems about colors.

2015’s Sound Poem Project: 14 poets, 177 poems about sounds.

2016’s Found Object Poem Project: 28 poets, 346 poems about objects.

We nearly doubled the number of participants and the number of poems this year! Yes, this February included Leap Day, but we can’t attribute all that writing to a single day. It takes stamina and commitment to complete this project.

The most-written-about objects were early in the month:

Lotus Pods (Day 10, 17 poems)

Antique Store Dolls (Day 6, 16 Poems)

 

Least written about objects were:

Garlic Bud (Day 28, 6 poems)

Horse Figurine (Day 20, 7 poems)

Maybe we were running out of steam by the last ten days. All five of the days I skipped this year were in the final ten days of the project.

There were five people who completed the challenge, writing a poem for each of our 29 prompts. As promised, I will be sending prizes to these prolific poets: look for something fun from one of my favorite Etsy shops, Petite Paperie.

singer

nest

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our 29-poem writers are: Linda Baie, Jessica Bigi, Donna Smith, Carol Varsalona, and last year’s winner, Charles Waters.

Congratulations to all of you on a great month of writing!

Before we get to a list of links for each day, I wanted to give special kudos to one poet, Jessica Bigi. Jessica was new to our project this year. I have appreciated her enthusiasm for our community and watching her poetry develop over the last month.

2011 Summer A 225On our final day, I posted one last found object prompt for everyone to try. I wasn’t going to post any responses, but Jessica’s poem is so striking that I had to share it today.

The object is a door-knocker. What I did not tell you is that this is the door of a famous house, Orchard House, where Louisa May Alcott set her novel, LITTLE WOMEN.

Griffin
By Jessica Bigi

At age seven he
showed himself
to me wings of
golden sunshine
me inside a room
of a locust tree
looking through a
window to his world
and still to this day
I will never know why
though I have
never told a soul
until today
I guess age seven
is magical
and this a
Griffin knows

Would you like to go back and revisit all of the poems in our project? If your name is missing from any of these days and its important to you to see it listed, please let me know.

Project Announcement

Model Responses and the Week 1 Prompts

Monday, February 1
FOUND OBJECT: 100 year-old Mailing Box
Poems by: Diane Mayr, Molly Hogan, Mary Lee Hahn, Linda Baie, Jessica Bigi, Margaret Simon, Laura Shovan, Matt Forrest Esenwine, Catherine Flynn, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Brenda Harsham, Charles Waters, Donna Smith, Carol Varsalona, Jan Godown Annino.

Tuesday, February 2
FOUND OBJECT: Fancy Produce
Poems by: Mary Lee Hahn, Jessica Bigi, Diane Mayr, Molly Hogan, Laura Shovan, Linda Baie, Matt Forrest Esenwine, Margaret Simon, Jennifer Lewis, Charles Waters, Donna Smith, Carol Varsalona, Jan Godown Annino.

Wednesday, February 3
FOUND OBJECT: Moth Eggs
Poems by: Jessica Bigi, Margaret Simon, Diane Mayr, Mary Lee Hahn, Molly Hogan, Linda Baie, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Laura Shovan, Charles Waters, Donna Smith, Carol Varsalona.

Thursday, February 4
FOUND OBJECT: Table Fan
Poems by: Jessica Bigi, Diane Mayr, Margaret Simon, Laura Shovan, Molly Hogan, Mary Lee Hahn, Linda Baie, Carol Varsalona, Catherine Flynn, Charles Waters, Donna Smith, Jan Godown Annino.

Friday, February 5 at Guest Blog, Radio, Rhythm & Rhyme
FOUND OBJECT: Tomato Moon
Poems by: Matt Forrest Esenwine, Jessica Bigi, Diane Mayr, Molly Hogan, Margaret Simon, Carol Varsalona, Laura Shovan, Mary Lee Hahn, Linda Baie, Charles Waters, Donna Smith.

Saturday, February 6
FOUND OBJECT: Antique Dolls
Poems by: Jennifer Lewis, Diane Mayr, Linda Baie,  Molly Hogan, Catherine Flynn, Heidi Mordhorst, Laura Shovan, Carol Varsalona, Matt Forrest Esenwine, Mary Lee Hahn, Jessica Bigi, Margaret Simon, Patricia VanAmburg, Charles Waters, Donna Smith, Jone Rush  MacCulloch.

Sunday, February 7
FOUND OBJECT: Blood Letting Knife
Poems by: Diane Mayr, Jessica Bigi, Laura Shovan, Catherine Flynn, Linda Baie, Molly Hogan, Carol Varsalona, Mary Lee Hahn, Matt Forrest Esenwine, Charles Waters, Donna Smith, Jone Rush MacCulloch.

Monday, February 8
FOUND OBJECT: Sculpture in the Woods
Poems by: Laura Shovan, Jessica Bigi, Heidi Mordhorst, Carol Varsalona, Linda Baie, Margaret Simon, Donna Smith, Diane Mayr, Joanne R. Polner, Kay McGriff, Molly Hogan, Mary Lee Hahn, Catherine Flynn, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Charles Waters.

Tuesday, February 9
FOUND OBJECT: Tire Tracks in Snow
Poems by: Molly Hogan, Jessica Bigi, Linda Baie, Violet Nesdoly, Carol Varsalona, Mary Lee Hahn, Donna Smith, Laura Shovan, Diane Mayr, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Catherine Flynn, Kay McGiff, Charles Waters, Margaret Simon.

Wednesday, February 10 at Guest Blog, Reflections on the Teche
FOUND OBJECT: Lotus Pods
Poems by: Diane Mayr, Patricia VanAmburg, Jessica Bigi, Molly Hogan, Laura Shovan, Charles Waters, Buffy Silverman, Catherine Flynn, Linda Baie, Carol Varsalona, Violet Nesdoly, Heidi Mordhorst, Donna Smith, Mary Lee Hahn, Margaret Simon, Jone Rush MacCulloch.

Thursday, February 11
FOUND OBJECT: Walnut Doll
Poems by: Diane Mayr, Carol Varsalona, Laura Shovan, Linda Baie, Violet Nesdoly, Donna Smith, Jessica Bigi, Mary Lee Hahn, Matt Forrest Esenwine, Margaret Simon, Catherine Flynn, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Charles Waters.

Friday, February 12
FOUND OBJECT: Whipped Cream
Poems by: Patricia VanAmburg, Diane Mayr, Jessica Bigi, Margaret Simon, Mary Lee Hahn, Donna Smith, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Catherine Flynn, Linda Baie, Carol Varsalona,  Matt Forrest Esenwine, Laura Shovan, Heidi Mordhorst, Charles Waters.

Saturday, February 13
FOUND OBJECT: PUFFER FISH SKELETON
Poems by: Diane Mayr, Laura Shovan, Jessica Bigi, Margaret Simon, Linda Baie, Mary Lee Hahn, Donna Smith, Carol Varsalona, Catherine Flynn, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Charles Waters.

Sunday, February 14
FOUND OBJECT: Hot Potato
Poems by: Violet Nesdoly, Jessica Bigi, Laura Shovan, Carol Varsalona, Heidi Mordhorst, Diane Mayr, Linda Baie, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Mary Lee Hahn, Donna Smith, Charles Waters, Molly Hogan.

Monday, February 15 at Guest Blog, My Juicy Little Universe
FOUND OBJECT: Coffee Mug
Poems by: Jessica Bigi, Matt Forrest Esenwine, Catherine Flynn, Laura Shovan, Mary Lee Hahn, Heidi Mordhorst, Diane Mayr, Buffy Silverman, Carol Varsalona, Linda Baie, Donna Smith, Julieanne Harmatz, Jone Rush  MacCulloch, Charles Waters.

Tuesday, February 16
FOUND OBJECT: Sculpture
Poems by: Victoria Costa, Jessica Bigi, Laura Shovan, Carol Varsalona, Mary Lee Hahn, Donna Smith, Catherine Flynn, Diane Mayr, Linda Baie, Robyn Hood Black, Buffy Silverman, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Charles Waters.

Wednesday, February 17 at Guest Blog, Mainely Write
FOUND OBJECT: Hot  Pink Sandal
Poems by: Diane Mayr, Jessica Bigi, Carol Varsalona, Linda Baie, Catherine Flynn, Mary Lee Hahn, Buffy Silverman, Donna Smith, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Laura Shovan, Heidi Mordhorst, Margaret Simon, Charles Waters.

Thursday, February 18
FOUND OBJECT: “Typewriter Eraser, Scale X” Sculpture
Poems by: Jessica Bigi, Diane Mayr, Donna Smith, Carol Varsalona, Mary Lee Hahn, Linda Baie, Catherine Flynn, Margaret Simon, Laura Shovan, Matt Forrest Esenwine, Charles Water, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Buffy Silverman.

Friday, February 19
FOUND OBJECT: Deer Skull
Poems by: Mary Lee Hahn, Jessica Bigi, Donna Smith, Linda Baie, Matt Forrest Esenwine, Patricia VanAmburg, Charles Waters, Carol Varsalona, Heather Meloche, Laura Shovan.

Saturday, February 20 at Guest Blog, Deowriter
FOUND OBJECT: Horse Figurine
Poems by: Donna Smith, Jessica Bigi, Margaret Simon, Linda Baie, Carol Varsalona, Charles Waters, Jone Rush MacCulloch.

Sunday, February 21
FOUND OBJECT: Antique Sewing Machine
Poems by: Diane Mayr, Linda Baie, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Jessica Bigi, Matt Forrest Esenwine, Donna Smith, Carol Varsalona, Charles Waters, Catherine Flynn.

Monday, February 22
FOUND OBJECT: Stick Insect
Poems by: Mary Lee Hahn, Donna Smith, Carol Varsalona, Jessica Bigi, Charles Watesr, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Linda Baie, Diane Mayr.

Tuesday, February 23 at Guest Blog, BOOKSEED STUDIO
FOUND OBJECT: Library of Congress Cart
Poems by: Jan Godown Annino, Jessica Bigi, Donna Smith, Linda Baie, Laura Shovan, Carol Varsalona, Diane Mayr, Mary Lee Hahn, Charles Waters, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Heidi Mordhorst.

Wednesday, February 24
FOUND OBJECT: Phoebe Nest
Poems by: Jessica Bigi, Diane Mayr, Heidi Mordhorst, Mary Lee Hahn, Matt Forrest Esenwine, Linda Baie, Laura Shovan, Charles Waters, Donna Smith, Carol Varsalona, Jone Rush MacCulloch.

Thursday, February 25
FOUND OBJECT: Pearl Harbor Keys
Poems by: Diane Mayr, Laura Shovan, Donna Smith, Jessica Bigi, Heidi Mordhorst, Charles Waters, Mary Lee Hahn,  Carol Varsalona, Molly Hogan, Linda Baie.

Friday, February 26 at Guest Blog, Michael Ratcliffe’s Poetry
FOUND OBJECT: Sun Sign
Poems by: Michael Ratcliffe, Diane Mayr, Jessica Bigi, Heidi Mordhorst, Donna Smith, Carol Varsalona, Mary Lee Hahn, Molly Hogan, Charles Waters, Laura Shovan, Linda Baie.

Saturday, February 27
FOUND OBJECT: Architectural Ruins
Poems by: Jessica Bigi, Carol Varsalona, Diane Mayr, Molly Hogan, Linda Baie, Donna Smith, Buffy Silverman, Margaret Simon, Charles Waters, Laura Shovan, Mary Lee Hahn.

Sunday, February 28 at Guest Blog, Bookseed Studio
FOUND OBJECT: Garlic Bud
Poems by: Carol Varsalona, Margaret Simon, Charles Waters, Diane Mayr, Donna Smith, Jessica Bigi.

Sunday, February 29
FOUND OBJECT: Carnival Truck
Poems by: Jessica Bigi, Charles Waters, Diane Mayr, Mary Lee Hahn, Linda Baie, Carol Varsalona, Molly Hogan, Donna Smith.

Before we close the project, I’d like to send a special thank you to all of my guest hosts: Matt Forrest Esenwine, Margaret Simon, Heidi Mordhorst, Donna Smith, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Jan Godown Annino, and Mike Ratcliffe. It was a lot of work to get the poems posted every day and I could not have done it (sanity intact) without all of you.

Since participation in this project has made such a jump, I will be looking for a different platform next year — one where we can all upload our own poems to community page that we share. Ideas? Suggestions? Leave a comment.

Before you know it, National Poetry Month will be here. I will not be doing a NPM project this year. Instead, I’ll be getting ready to launch my debut children’s novel!

Until then, enjoy the 2016 20th Anniversary National Poetry Month poster.

NPM-Poster-2016

You can request a free poster from the Academy of American Poets.

 

2016 Found Object Poem Project: Day 29

Dear friends, thank you for taking the leap and writing with me every day (or most days, or some days) during the month of February. I’m astounded by the number of people who participated this year. The poems everyone shared were a marvel. I loved seeing resonances and echoes between the poems every day, just as much as I enjoyed the outliers, the outside-the-box poems.

It is Leap Day, the 29th and last day of our month-long daily writing project.

This year’s theme has been FOUND OBJECTS. For those of you who are finding this project for the first time, please read my introductory post. You’ll find more information and all of the Week 4 FOUND OBJECTS at this post.

A few notes before we get to today’s poems:

I will continue adding poems to each day through Wednesday, March 2 only. If you’d like to catch up on a few days you missed, now is the time.

I will post a wrap-up of the project on Friday, March 4 for Poetry Friday. That post will include a working list of poets for each day of the project. It’s up to you whether you want to double check or not. Please get corrections to me no later than Monday, March 7.

I will post a list of the prizes this Friday, and winners early next week. I hope that covers everything. On to today…

dmayrTruckFOUND: CARNIVAL TRUCK

Thanks to Diane Mayr of the blog Random Noodling for sending in a celebratory object for our last day. Whether you consider this a functional object or a toy (aren’t toys functional objects?), I hope you enjoy writing about it today.

Let’s start with Diane’s poem, since she found our source of inspiration for today.

I have to agree with Diane when she says, “I’m glad the month is over, but I’m also sorry that the challenge has ended.”

In the Kingdom of Strip Mall
By Diane Mayr

Two ponies rest in
a pick-up bed while
the giant, weighed down
by bags of trinkets, trades
out a tarnished royal
carriage for a tethered
helicopter. Not even
a bereft child dares
to question the actions
of this prince of a man.

***

Mary Lee Hahn left a lovely note for all of us. “It’s been a great month of writing, and for that, I thank you, Laura, for a fabulous challenge. To the other writers, I express my regrets that I didn’t have more time this month to be a better community member. I read all of your poems, but my praises and comments to you stayed inside my head and my heart.”

Circulation

After a lifetime spent galloping in circles,
I’m finally going to put some actual distance beneath these hooves.

I’ve got this chance to move forward,
and I’ll enjoy the ride before the next place I park.

The blur of landscape as we roar down the road
is an art I admire, but have never been able to achieve.

©Mary Lee Hahn, 2016

***

I’m enjoying all of these end of project notes. Here is Linda Baie’s: “I’ve loved reading everyone’s poems, and they have always served as lovely inspiration. Thanks all for a beautiful month, plus a leap day, too!”

The Past We’ve Lost

That fifty cents took a long time saving-
penny by penny plopped in a jar.
Papa said I’d grow up to be a banker.
If I knew about money, I’d go far.

Now all I wanted was to ride the horses,
go round and round, pretend I was tough.
I did chores for Mama to earn the pennies:
swept, washed dishes till I had enough.

They pulled into the park last Saturday.
I had to eat breakfast, was ready to run.
Two shiny quarters appeared from Ma’s pocket.
She sent me with a smile, best wishes for fun.

Yep, those horses galloped like the wind.
Up and down, and round and round I went.
I was a whoopin’, hollerin’ cowboy,
appreciating the value of my fifty cents.

Linda Baie ©All Rights Reserved

***

IMG_1950

Drawing by Jessica Bigi

Thanks to Jessica Bigi, not only for this acrostic poem, but for the drawing that goes with it.

Carousel
By Jessica Bigi

C alligraphy horses marching

A B C –1 2 3

R acing rhymes across paper

O utlines of a story

U sing imagination

S entence horseshoes

E nchanting endings

L etters laughter learning

***

Charles Waters has a rhyming poem today. The rhymes themselves make me think of carnival music.

Merry-Go-Round
By Charles Waters

Candy colored poles,
riding up and down,
horses prancing,
people dancing
above ground …
Merry-go-round.

***

carol vThe title of Carol Varsalona’s digital creation is perfect for today.

***

Donna Smith noticed the word “Library” on the building and used that in her poem.

Carousel

I wanted to go get a book,
So I hopped upon my horse
The horse went round and round
But I got no closer, of course.

I stuck out my thumb for a bit
And hitched a ride on a truck
And then, my horse and I
Had much better book hunting luck

We made it to the library
Where I found something to read
Then jumped back on the truck
In the saddle of my white steed

We still went round and round
As the trucker took us back;
It’s hard to ride too far away
If the horse won’t leave its track.

©2016, Donna JT Smith, all rights reserved

And Molly Hogan left us a note and a poem today. Thanks for this gift of a poem, Molly!

“Today’s picture was perfect. The carnival may be packed away, but rich memories linger and we’re all winners for having come along on the ride. Thank you!”

Laura’s Carnival
By Molly Hogan

The carnival arrives
on a wintery breeze
A sensory extravaganza
with an open invitation,
but…
“You can’t win
if you don’t play!”
So, dive on in
Ride on waves of words,
rhythm and rhyme,
alliteration and syncopation.
Visit the funhouse
where words twist and twine
into intriguing shapes
and mirrors reflect new images
into eternity.
Try your skill on the games.
Select words like a sharpshooter
Picking off targets.
With all your strength and wit,
set your pen onto paper
with a resounding crash.
“Ring the bell!
Ring the bell!”
Overindulge on tasty terms
and luscious prose.
Wipe the grease from your chin.
Take a spin on the carousel,
up and down,
hang on and enjoy the ride.

But all good things
must come to an end.
It’s time
to pack up the party
shut down the fun
No days left
in this carnival’s run.
Phrases litter the ground
and crumpled papers
rustle in the wind
“Step right up!
Everyone’s a winner!”

***

2011 Summer A 225Just for fun: Here’s a bonus found object to enjoy on your own. I won’t be sharing poems in a post, but feel free to leave them in the comments. I hope you will post them on your own blogs and websites. I’ll give you a little history on this object during the wrap-up.

Interested in what we’ve written so far? Here are links to our recent poems (I will update this list soon — apologies to those I missed):

Sunday, February 21
FOUND OBJECT: Antique Sewing Machine
Poems by: Diane Mayr, Linda Baie, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Jessica Bigi, Matt Forrest Esenwine, Donna Smith, Carol Varsalona, Charles Waters.

Note: You will find links to all of  the Week 1, 2, and 3 poems at this post.

Monday, February 22
FOUND OBJECT: Stick Insect
Poems by: Mary Lee Hahn, Donna Smith, Carol Varsalona, Jessica Bigi, Charles Watesr, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Linda Baie, Diane Mayr.

Tuesday, February 23 at BOOKSEED STUDIO
FOUND OBJECT: Library of Congress Cart
Poems by: Jan Godown Annino, Jessica Bigi, Donna Smith, Linda Baie, Laura Shovan, Carol Varsalona, Diane Mayr, Mary Lee Hahn, Charles Waters, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Heidi Mordhorst.

Wednesday, February 24
FOUND OBJECT: Phoebe Nest
Poems by: Jessica Bigi, Diane Mayr, Heidi Mordhorst, Mary Lee Hahn, Matt Forrest Esenwine, Linda Baie, Laura Shovan, Charles Waters, Donna Smith, Carol Varsalona.

Thursday, February 25
FOUND OBJECT: Pearl Harbor Keys

Friday, February 26 at Michael Ratcliffe’s Poetry
FOUND OBJECT: Sun Sign

Saturday, February 27
FOUND OBJECT: Architectural Ruins

Sunday, February 28 at Bookseed Studio
FOUND OBJECT: Garlic Bud

2016 Found Object Poem Project: Day 28

Hello, Found Object Poets. Today is the Mother-Daughter luncheon at my daughter’s high school, so Jan Godown Annino is filling in for me once again. Please post your poems in the comments here or at Jan’s blog BOOKSEED STUDIO.

IMG_2204FOUND: Allium Garlic Bud 

The found object for today was contributed by Mary Lee Hahn. Thanks for the correction, Mary Lee. You had me and many others fooled with today’s object!

You will find the Day 28 Found Object Poem Project post at Jan Godown Annino’s blog, BOOKSEED STUDIO. Thank you for guest hosting *twice* this month, Jan.

 

 

 

 

dmayrTruck

DAY 29 FOUND OBJECT (Leap Day, February 29)

I’ll see you back here for our last day, Leap Day, February 29. You can leave your Day 27 responses at this post or in the comments on Jan’s blog.

2016 Found Object Poem Project: Day 27

It’s Day 27 of our month-long daily writing project.

This year’s theme is FOUND OBJECTS. For those of you who are new to the project, please read my introductory post. You’ll find more information and all of the Week 4 FOUND OBJECTS at this post.

Now that we are down to the final three days, I’d like to see how pleased and amazed I am by everyone’s enthusiasm this year. I haven’t put together the numbers yet, but I know many more people participated and contributed poems this year. It’s been wonderful to share our early drafts in a supportive community.

I have family visiting today, so I’m only adding Day 27’s poems. If you’ve left a poem for another day, I’ll post it later.

IMG_7328FOUND: ARCHITECTURAL RUINS

While I didn’t make a separate category for antiques, we did have several prompts that one might find in an antique shop. Buffy Silverman’s contribution for today takes “functional object,” “antique,” and “art” and blends them together in an intriguing landscape.

Will we see some characters taking the poetic stage before this backdrop?

Here is a lovely metaphor poem from Jessica Bigi.

Poetry
By Jessica Bigi

Ivory sentences framing
Walls of pages
Rich mossy words
Turning under fingertips
Bookmark memories
Sipping tea we sit reading
In life’s library

***

Carol Varsalona has another digital composition at her blog. These have been really fun, so I hope you’ll visit Carol to take a look: http://beyondliteracylink.blogspot.com/2016/02/celebrating-writing.html.

Moss-covered ruins,
aching with age,
tumble through time.
Architects wonder.
Designers plan,
Writers clear paths
with their words.

©Carol Varsalona, 2016

***

Today’s found object reminded me of my visit to Italy last June. I took some notes on my phone while we were visiting the ruins at Paestum and “found” an incident I’d forgotten about.

Ruins: Paestum

By Laura Shovan

A dry dirt road spooled
between the ruins
and the tourist shops,
restaurant, museum.
“Did you hear that?”
I asked the friends
I’d traveled with by train.
They shook their heads.
I took it as a sign.
No one else heard
the peacock’s scream.
It called to me only.
The bird is sacred
to Hera, a symbol
of her beautiful, large eyes.
Near the columns
of Paestum’s great temple —
dedicated to Hera as wife —
I said a prayer, imagined
coming home to you,
dressed in blue feathers.

***

Diane Mayr is thinking about the timelessness of ancient architecture.

Granite Speaks of Eternity
By Diane Mayr

We thought we were given our
own eternity by quarrymen who
released us from mountains
that held us prisoner.

Builders hauled and lifted
and fit us into works
of architectural magnificence
decorated by masters of art.

Surely, we would honor man and
ourselves by lasting forever.
Then along came the Bryophytes
reducing our dreams to dust.

***

I found Mary Lee Hahn’s haiku for today to be heartbreaking — and in such a small space.

every life
(hopefully softened by moss)
becomes rubble

©Mary Lee Hahn, 2015

***

Today’s object has many of us thinking about time. Molly Hogan’s contribution is a short poem on this theme.

Ruins
By Molly Hogan

Within an eternity of arches
Moss masses
on tumbled marble
and time marches on
***

So many poets today are highlighting the moss growing on the ruins. One symbolic of life, the other symbolic of …? I like the way Linda Baie’s poem draws our attention to the dual meaning of “ruin.”

the word ‘ruin’
softened by moss –
spring deceit

Linda Baie ©All Rights Reserved
***

Donna Smith says, “Couldn’t resist a bit of London Bridges falling at stanzas’ ends…”

Marble Arches

What once was lofty white and pure
That all thought would so long endure
Became eroded and unsure
This ostentatious entryway
Became just ruins in the way;
In days gone by they stood above
Each block fitting like a glove
To house many a city dove
City dove
City dove
House many a city dove
Marble arches

In paths they lie upon the ground
As if in hunt they had been downed
Becoming stilled, no echoed sound
Wearing hides of green and brown
Those marble arches fallen down
Would that we could just recrown
Just recrown
Just recrown
Would that we could just recrown
Marble arches.

©2016, Donna JT Smith, all rights reserved
***

Buffy Silverman reveals a little bit more about the photograph in her poem. Thanks, Buffy!

In Antigua

Earthy scents rise
from crumbled ruins,
roots reclaim the glories
of civilization,
brought from an old world
imposed on a new world.
Moss cares not about conqueror
or conquered,
religion or culture,
order or plan.
It spills over columns
and stones,
churches and temples,
liberating all.

©Buffy Silverman

***

It’s good to see Margaret Simon back. She says, “Today I am happy to be back with a poem of hope.”

In the graveyard of buildings
stone becomes mulch
for grass and weeds.

Nature does what it does best–
continues to grow
renew relive.

I walk among the fallen stone
peek behind the bolder
see a hidden nest.

Yes, there is new life
everywhere.
Just look!

by Margaret Simon

***

Charles Waters’ poem has me thinking about what this building might have been.

Morning’s Promise
By Charles Waters

Sunlight shimmies
into cathedrals.
Beams of luminescent
blessings slide through
stained glass into
the consciousness
of each remarkable,
flawed parishioner
on this holy day
of rest.

***

IMG_2204

DAY 28 FOUND OBJECT PROMPT (February 28 at BOOKSEED STUDIO)

Reminder: Tomorrow we will be back at Jan Godown Annino’s blog, BOOKSEED STUDIO, for Day 28.

We’ll return here for Leap Day and the final prompt.

Interested in what we’ve written so far? Here are links to this week’s poems (I will update this list soon — apologies to those I missed):

Sunday, February 21
FOUND OBJECT: Antique Sewing Machine
Poems by: Diane Mayr, Linda Baie, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Jessica Bigi, Matt Forrest Esenwine, Donna Smith, Carol Varsalona, Charles Waters.

Note: You will find links to all of  the Week 1, 2, and 3 poems at this post.

Monday, February 22
FOUND OBJECT: Stick Insect
Poems by: Mary Lee Hahn, Donna Smith, Carol Varsalona, Jessica Bigi, Charles Watesr, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Linda Baie, Diane Mayr.

Tuesday, February 23 at BOOKSEED STUDIO
FOUND OBJECT: Library of Congress Cart
Poems by: Jan Godown Annino, Jessica Bigi, Donna Smith, Linda Baie, Laura Shovan, Carol Varsalona, Diane Mayr, Mary Lee Hahn, Charles Waters, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Heidi Mordhorst.

Wednesday, February 24
FOUND OBJECT: Phoebe Nest
Poems by: Jessica Bigi, Diane Mayr, Heidi Mordhorst, Mary Lee Hahn, Matt Forrest Esenwine, Linda Baie, Laura Shovan, Charles Waters, Donna Smith, Carol Varsalona.

Thursday, February 25
FOUND OBJECT: Pearl Harbor Keys

Friday, February 26 at Michael Ratcliffe’s Poetry
FOUND OBJECT: Sun Sign

2016 Found Object Poem Project: Day 26 – Poetry Friday

Hello, Found Object Poets and Poetry Friday people. We have family visiting today, so my friend, the poet Michael Ratcliffe, is guest hosting. While you’re visiting Mike’s new blog, be sure to check out his just-published book of poems, SHARDS OF BLUE.

IMG_3911FOUND: Sun Sign

You will find the Day 26 Found Object Poem Project post at Mike’s blog, MICHAEL RATCLIFFE’S POETRY. Mike contributed the deer’s skull that we wrote about last Friday — I know that was a great prompt for many of us! Thank you for that photograph and for hosting today’s prompt and responses, Mike.

 

 

 

 

IMG_7328

DAY 27 FOUND OBJECT PROMPT (February 27)

I’ll see you back here tomorrow for Day 27. You can leave your Day 26responses at this post or in the comments at Mike’s blog.

2016 Found Object Poem Project: Day 25

It’s Day 25 of our month-long daily writing project.

This year’s theme is FOUND OBJECTS. For those of you who are new to the project, please read my introductory post. You’ll find more information and all of the Week 4 FOUND OBJECTS at this post.

How is everyone feeling now that there are only five days of found object prompts left (counting today)? I’m still trying to catch up on a few days I missed last week. This may be the first year that I don’t complete my own challenge!

Hawaii 088FOUND: KEYS

As usual, I haven’t revealed any details or background information about the Day 25 found object until now.

This photograph was taken on our 2009 trip to Hawaii. I “found” the keys while we toured a submarine museum at the Pearl Harbor Memorial site. If I had shared that fact, would your responses to the keys have changed?

I was interested in the fact that the keys are numbered up to 144. In addition to being the square of 12, 144 happens to be the 12th number in the Fibonacci sequence. That inspired me to write a Fib poem today. The title can be read as part of the poem.

144
By Laura Shovan

Keys
hang
on board,
each one tagged,
STATE ROOM, CREWS QUARTERS,
each numbered, labeled: PANTRY, TOOLS.
How many hands lost at sea long ago used these keys?

***

The keys reminded Donna Smith of a favorite literary character, Lewis Carroll’s Alice.

Donna says, “This poem is way longer than I’d had visions of… it just kept going and growing… a little like Alice…”

Key to Happiness

Alice to herself:
“Which do you pick, Alice
Which key will you choose?
If you pick the wrong one
You could stand to lose…”

“There’s really no wrong choice,”
She heard Cheshire Cat say,
“So pick any one;
Don’t think, don’t delay.”

Alice to herself:
“Be cautious, my dear,
Use careful detection;
One key could be lucky,
So take care in selection.”

“Please, go on,” said Cheshire,
“And make one your choice;
One key’s for a clock,
One’s for a Rolls Royce.”

Alice to herself:
“If you pick the wrong key
Don’t pout at your lot;
Perhaps it will still be
A pretty good spot.”

“Which one?” asked the Cat,
The big or the little?
The left or the right?
Or one in the middle?”

Alice to herself:
“One key may unlock
The best kind of thing,
Or maybe the worst
Is what it will bring.”

“There’s really no wrong choice,”
Cheshire Cat said once more,
“So pick any one, dear;
Just not 74.”

Alice to herself:
“Well, here goes nothing,
I’ll just take the dive
And say I want key number
One hundred five.”

“Oh, very good choice
You’ve done very well,
For this is the key
For something so swell!”

Alice to herself:
“Something that’s swell
Sounds pretty great!”
And with that CC handed her
Keys to some skates.

Then Alice went swiftly
Off down the street
Rejoicing that she’d
Picked a key that was sweet.

It wasn’t a Rolls Royce
Or other grand treasure
But a smallish-foot-sized
Bringer-of-pleasure!

©2016, Donna JT Smith, all rights reserved

***

A short poem from Jessica Bigi today. This one pairs nicely with Donna’s Alice theme.

Poem
By Jessica Bigi

Keys inside of keys
Unlocking doors
WISDOM

***

I see the repeating keys showing up in the repetition Heidi Mordhorst uses in her poem today.

The action of attraction

There are screws that hold us tight
there are hooks on which we hang
there are locks that shut us in
there are keys that shoot our bolts

whichever way the waves rise
whichever way the wind blows
whichever way the ship rolls
whichever way the floor jolts
we’re shot, we’re shut, we’re hooked, we’re screwed
our brassy hearts hang hard and cold
waiting for a touch, a hand
waiting for the warmth of skin

and when it comes we leap to it!
we buzz with loosing, waking need
to staterooms, quarters, lockers, deck —
and now the crossing can begin.

©Heidi Mordhorst 2016

***

Charles Waters is using the key not as a physical object, but as a metaphorical idea.

The Key
By Charles Waters

The key to unlocking
my heart is easy.
Be nice to others,
be nice to me.

***

I remember thinking that Carol Varsalona’s nest poem yesterday might have been written about today’s keys. Today, I’m thinking that Mary Lee Hahn’s keys poem has elements from  yesterday’s Phoebe nest.

The Key to Today’s Room

Listen for the first wren
who sings in the dark
at the end
of an endless
February.

©Mary Lee Hahn, 2016

Blogging alongside at: http://www.maryleehahn.com/2016/02/found-object-poem-project_25.html

***

Speaking of Carol Varsalona, she created a great key-shaped Wordle to go with today’s found object. Check it out here: http://beyondliteracylink.blogspot.com/2016/02/keys-to-learning.html.

Keys unlock doors to learning.
Teachers hold the key.
Students respond
in cultures
of trust and engagement
where passion
mixes with purpose
for
wonderment
to evolve.

©CVarsalona, 2016

***

It’s great to see Molly Hogan joining us again. Glad you’re back, Molly!

A Constellation of Keys
By Molly Hogan

Common key cards
have no romance,
slipping into a pocket
without a wrinkle,
unnoticeable,
silent and disposable.

Carved metal keys
have character
and reassuring heft.
They clink happily
in a pocket,
socializing with spare change,
or if you please,
they sit in hand,
guaranteeing imminent access
or denying the same.

Patiently waiting on hooks,
a constellation of keys
has purpose,
power and potential,
silently offering up
an array of possibilities.

***

I like the way that a different setting in Diane Mayr’s poem changes my ideas about the keys.

Key Rack at My-Big-Heart Hotel

You asked for the key
but, typically, you
neglected to provide
your room number.

You take for granted
I know where you’ve
decided to settle in.
Not so.

This is no tiny inn.
I have singles,
the standard rooms,
and a Royal Suite.

Where would I put you?
I’d say utility closet
between the elevator
and the ice machine.

© Diane Mayr, all rights reserved

***

The more responses I read today, the more I realize that keys have deep connotations for many of us. A key is a symbolic object. Here is Linda Baie’s poem.

More Than Door Openers

Success shortcuts
Heart pathways
Kingdom streets
Happiness highways
Castle trails
Failure dead ends
Victory alleys

Linda Baie ©All Rights Reserved

***

IMG_3911

DAY 26 FOUND OBJECT PROMPT (February 26 at Michael Ratcliffe’s Poetry)

Reminder: Tomorrow, Poetry Friday, we will be at Michael Ratcliffe’s new blog for Day 26.

Interested in what we’ve written so far? Here are links to this week’s poems:

Sunday, February 21
FOUND OBJECT: Antique Sewing Machine
Poems by: Diane Mayr, Linda Baie, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Jessica Bigi, Matt Forrest Esenwine, Donna Smith, Carol Varsalona, Charles Waters.

Note: You will find links to all of  the Week 1, 2, and 3 poems at this post.

Monday, February 22
FOUND OBJECT: Stick Insect
Poems by: Mary Lee Hahn, Donna Smith, Carol Varsalona, Jessica Bigi, Charles Watesr, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Linda Baie, Diane Mayr.

Tuesday, February 23 at BOOKSEED STUDIO
FOUND OBJECT: Library of Congress Cart
Poems by: Jan Godown Annino, Jessica Bigi, Donna Smith, Linda Baie, Laura Shovan, Carol Varsalona, Diane Mayr, Mary Lee Hahn, Charles Waters, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Heidi Mordhorst.

Wednesday, February 24
FOUND OBJECT: Phoebe Nest
Poems by: Jessica Bigi, Diane Mayr, Heidi Mordhorst, Mary Lee Hahn, Matt Forrest Esenwine, Linda Baie, Laura Shovan, Charles Waters, Donna Smith, Carol Varsalona.

2016 Found Object Poem Project: Day 24

It’s Day 24 of our 2016 daily write-in. This year’s theme is FOUND OBJECTS. We have a new writing prompt for every day in February.

For those of you who are new to my blog, please read my introductory post about the February daily write-in. You’ll find more information and all of the Week 4 FOUND OBJECTS at this post.

I’ve ordered the prizes for most frequent contributors. Can you believe we have less than a week to go?

Now that we are in the home stretch, do you find your words flowing quickly? I missed several days last week, but surprised myself with a steamy ode to a book cart yesterday.

On to Day 24. I’m having some formatting issues with today’s post — sorry about that!

106FOUND: Bird’s Nest

We’ve had several natural objects over the course of the project. Many of us have stories about happening upon a birds’ nest in an unexpected place. I remember little birds nesting in my grandparents’ hedgerows when I was a child. It was a thrill to peek between the tight leaves and branches to see eggs sitting in their nest.

I hope that Matt Forrest Esenwine will stop by today to tell us more about this nest. Here is his haiku, which identifies the birds.

Phoebe meets Phoebe,
family flourishes; soon
five wee Phoebes fly

– © 2016, Matt Forrest Esenwine, all rights reserved

Jessica Bigi sent me a note along with her poem today. When an image or object like this nest triggers a memory, that’s rich soil for a piece of writing to grow in.

Jessica shared these memories: “I had a dear neighbor, Hannah, who always talked of birds building nest on her porch… One year a robin built a nest on my mom’s window sill around Easter. When I was just a little girl I had scared a robin and it dropped its worm. I picked it up and hid behind our lilac bush and dangled it. The bird took it from my hand.”
12771785_600865110063771_5572151131139772859_o

Photograph: Jessica Bigi

Seasons of Our Lives
By Jessica Bigi

We rest in woven words
Of those we love
How’s wings of love cradled us
When home seems distant
We wrap ourselves
In broken memories of
A home we once remembered
Nests of hope on the
windowsills of our hearts
For in the springs of our lives
Robins build their nest
At summers end their hatchlings
Fly into new beginnings of life
Reminding us that our lives and
homes must change as each season
folds into new beginings
We rest in woven words
Of those we love
***
Diane Mayr is in with one of her wonderful haiku. On her blog, Random Noodling, Diane has a great series called “Haiku Sticky.”
humans resign
themselves to the back entry
…swallows’ nest
***
I like the way that Heidi Mordhorst’s language in this poem mimics the “found object” quality of a birds’ nest built from whatever materials are on hand.
mudwattle
stuccohung
bugspatter
mossdangle
birdhuddle
homewe daren’t open that door© Heidi Mordhorst 2016
***
Mary Lee Hahn has a poem in the voice of the nest’s inhabitants.
Home

Sure, it’s small,
but to us, it’s cozy.

Yes, there’s a lot of traffic here,
but, well, you get used to it.

It’s kind of a mess,
but I’ll tidy up just as soon as I get the chance.

What you can’t see
is the perfection of light in the mornings.

You can’t know
the lingering warmth in the early evenings.

And I’m sure you can’t imagine
our view of the stars when the rest of the world is dark.

©Mary Lee Hahn, 2016

Check out Mary Lee’s blog post for today http://www.maryleehahn.com/2016/02/found-object-poem-project-home.html.

***
I decided to work with the memory of my British grandmother’s garden.
Hedgerows
by Laura Shovan
Every nest is tucked into the hedgerows
of the Old Rectory. Every scolding sparrow
watches my brother and me
with a nervous eye. Every nest
holds a memory of my grandmother
in her brown dress, parting the branches
so we might peer into that dark,
tight bramble of green, which hid
a bowl of eggs no bigger than my thumb.
***
Charles Waters incorporated a schoolyard rhyme into his poem. What fun!

LOVE BIRDS
By Charles Waters

Two love birds sitting in a tree:
Lovely, dovey, OMG.
T – W – Double E – T
Hubba, Hubba, leave them be.

***

We are in the haiku zone today, my friends. Here, Linda Baie made me think of the noise and movement that come with a busy nest.
on the back porch,
kids crowd the nest in cozy congestion –
millennials in the bird world.
Linda Baie ©All Rights Reserved
***
Donna Smith used the detail that Matt shared about the nest’s inhabitants in her poem.

We Three Phoebes (or Christmas in July)
By Donna Smith

We three Phoebes of
New Hampshire peek
Out of the nest
And open each beak;
Flies from Mamma,
Beetles from Papa,
Insects are what we seek.

Ohhh – oh!

Wings of wonder,
Wings of flight,
Wings of phoebes
Strong and light;
Nest we’re leaving,
Flight achieving,
We will fledge in a fortnight.

©2016, Donna JT Smith, all rights reserved

***

Carol Varsalona also has a family connection with the nest and her poem for today. I hope you’ll stop by her blog to see the photograph she’s paired with this poem and story.

Carol says, “I have one of my own at my post but my daughter who is buying for the first time fell in love with a house that has pet odors (dog, cats, birds). This may mean having to take up the hardwood floors.” http://beyondliteracylink.blogspot.com/2016/02/home-builders.html

Home Builders

Keys to a new home-
closer look-
a festive spring touch
outside our new front door-
a do it yourself decorating service?

Wait a minute,
did we ask for
shared space with neighbors?

Residency requirement needed immediately.
Whose paying the rent?

Moving day!!!

©Carol Varsalona, 2016

***

Sticking with our haiku theme today, here is Jone Rush MacCulloch’s contribution.

Sayornis phoebe
mud and grass dwellers
no flies here

***

Hawaii 088

DAY 25 FOUND OBJECT PROMPT (February 25)

See you tomorrow for Day 25.

REMINDER: If you have contributed any poems that have not been posted yet, please send me a reminder either in the comments or via email. I aim to have all of the poems up by the project wrap-up on Friday, March 4.

Interested in what we’ve written so far? Here are links to this week’s poems:

Sunday, February 21
FOUND OBJECT: Antique Sewing Machine
Poems by: Diane Mayr, Linda Baie, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Jessica Bigi, Matt Forrest Esenwine, Donna Smith, Carol Varsalona, Charles Waters.

Note: You will find links to all of  the Week 1, 2, and 3 poems at this post.

Monday, February 22
FOUND OBJECT: Stick Insect
Poems by: Mary Lee Hahn, Donna Smith, Carol Varsalona, Jessica Bigi, Charles Watesr, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Linda Baie, Diane Mayr.

Tuesday, February 23 at BOOKSEED STUDIO
FOUND OBJECT: Library of Congress Cart
Poems by: Jan Godown Annino, Jessica Bigi, Donna Smith, Linda Baie, Laura Shovan, Carol Varsalona, Diane Mayr, Mary Lee Hahn, Charles Waters.

2016 Found Object Poem Project: Day 23

Hello, Found Object Poets. I am taking a break today to catch up on poem writing. Jan Godown Annino has been kind enough to take over today’s hosting duties.

DSCN2011FOUND: LOC Cart

You will find the Day 23 Found Object Poem Project post at Jan’s blog BOOKSEED STUDIO. Thank you for hosting today’s prompt and responses, Jan, and for contributing such a great object!

 

 

 

106

DAY 24 FOUND OBJECT PROMPT (February 24)

I’ll see you back here tomorrow for Day 24. You can leave your Day 23 responses at this post or in the comments at Jan’s blog.

2016 Found Object Poem Project: Day 22

poetry_cake

Enjoy some birthday cake with me.

It’s Day 22 of our 2016 daily write-in. This year’s theme is FOUND OBJECTS. We have a new writing prompt for every day in February.

For those of you who are new to my blog, please read my introductory post about the February daily write-in. You’ll find more information and all of the Week 4 FOUND OBJECTS at this post.

PLEASE NOTE: This year, a few friendly bloggers have volunteered to host a day or two. Tomorrow’s post, which is DAY 23, will be at Jan Godown Annino’s blog, Bookseed Studio. Leave your Day 23 responses here, in the comments, or you can leave them at Jan’s blog. We will both make sure your poems get posted.

_MG_5477FOUND: STICK INSECT

Thanks to Poetry Friday blogger Buffy Silverman for finding this handsome master of camouflage for us today.

Mary Lee Hahn is looking at the symbiotic relationship between creature and tree.

Partners

You can’t see me.
I’m not here.
I freeze.
I blend.
I pose.

Glance away, then.
Lose attention.
I’m gone.
Gone where?
Tree knows.

©Mary Lee Hahn, 2016

Check out Mary Lee’s post here: http://www.maryleehahn.com/2016/02/found-object-poem-project-partners.html

***

Remember when we wrote about moth eggs, all the way back during week one? Donna Smith’s poem reminded me of that prompt.

ONE With the Tree

I freeze on the tree
I am ONE with the tree
I AM the tree
To act like a tree
One must BE the tree
When I am the TREE
You don’t see me
I am the perfect
Camouflagee
Even my eggs like free-
Falling seeds
Drop from me
When I am
The tree
I AM the perfect
Camouflagee
Or am I
The tree?

©2016, Donna JT Smith, all rights reserved

***

Carol Varsalona is backtracking and catching up on prompts (something I need to do also). You can find her Day 22, Day 21, and Day 1  poems at http://beyondliteracylink.blogspot.com/2016/02/daily-writing-workout.html.

hidden on a tree
game playing with predators
camouflage ante

©CVarsalona, 2016

***

I’m going to attempt some formatting with Jessica Bigi’s poem. I like how the form resembles our stick insect.

Walking Stick
By Jessica Bigi

One
Two
Three
Pick
Up
Sticks
Walking
On stilts
Eating
French-fried
Sticks
Making
Silly
Pictures
Out of
Pretzel
Sticks
Laughing
Out loud
At the
Funniest
Stick
I have see
Walking on
Stick legs
Up our
Apple
Tree

***

Here’s a wonderful portrait poem from Diane Mayr.

Gran Called Her, “My Walking Stick.”
By Diane Mayr

Afraid to ask why,
she pondered its
meaning in relation
to herself–did Gran
think she was skinny
like a stick insect?
Did she move slowly,
stiffly, awkwardly?
Was her complexion a
bit on the green side?

On a summer’s noon
Gran put a hand on
on the young girl’s
shoulder, “Let’s go
into lunch, My Walking
Stick.” She leaned into
the child who guided
her, while the girl
thought only of her
elbows and knees.

***

Another haiku from Charles Waters, this one focusing on the texture of the tree.

Tree Bark
By Charles Waters

tree bark follicles
peel away, fall like snowflakes
on frosted earth.

***

It’s interesting that many of us wrote today about what the insect is doing, the act of camouflage. Jone MacCulloch has a poem on this topic.

Camouflage

inconspicuous
tree bark
veiled twig
feigning death
until
the predator
vanishes

© 2016 Jone Rush MacCulloch all rights reserved

***

Linda Baie turned her response into a little love poem.

Unrequited

At this time it’s trying hard
to find a proper mate.
Crawling slowly up a tree,
it spies a winsome date.

But brownish gray, tall, thin and rough
tree twigs tend to trick
the hidden branching insect
we call the walking stick.

Linda Baie ©All Rights Reserved

DSCN2011

DAY 23 FOUND OBJECT PROMPT (February 23 at Bookseed Studio)

Reminder: Tomorrow, we’ll be spending Day 23  at Jan Godown Annino’s blog, Bookseed Studio.

Interested in what we’ve written so far? Here are links to this week’s poems:

Sunday, February 21
FOUND OBJECT: Antique Sewing Machine
Poems by: Diane Mayr, Linda Baie, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Jessica Bigi, Matt Forrest Esenwine, Donna Smith, Carol Varsalona.

Note: You will find links to all of  the Week 1, 2, and 3 poems at this post.

 

2016 Found Object Poem Project: Day 21 and Final Week Prompts

It’s February 21. That means we have completed three weeks of our daily write-in. Kudos to all, whether you’ve been participating every day, dropping in, or following along by reading the responses.

As you know, this year’s theme is FOUND OBJECTS. We have a new writing prompt for every day in February. The object of this project is to turn off our inner critics, play with a daily writing practice, and share the results in a community setting.

For those of you who are new to the project, please read my introductory post. You’ll find more information and all of the Week 3 FOUND OBJECTS at this post. At the end of the month, I’ll have prizes for the most frequent contributors. However, there’s no obligation to write every day. Drop in as often as you like.

I was away this weekend visiting family. If you’ve posted poems in the comments over the weekend, it may take me a day or two to move them into the blog posts. Thanks for being patient.

As always, remember when you leave a written response in the comments, include the number of the day, so I put it in the right place.

IMG_0496FOUND: Singer Sewing Machine

Thanks to Matt Forrest Esenwine for sending in today’s object, which fits in our functional object category.

My husband’s family is from Paterson, New Jersey. Paterson was the silk capital of the U.S. for many years. The city — home to poets Allen Ginsberg, William Carlos Williams, and Maria Mazziotti Gillan — was known for its textiles. We have an antique singer sewing machine passed down through the family in our home. I’ll have to snap a picture to share.

dmayr1Diane Mayr has a wonderful image/poem contribution to share today.

 

Diane did some research on Mr. Singer before creating this poem. The path from idea through research to poem is a fascinating one. I hope you’ll take a look at Diane’s post at Random Noodling, where you can also view a larger version of this image.

***

Linda Baie’s poem reminds me of one of my favorite scenes from the movie version of “Fiddler on the Roof.” Everyone in the village is talking about a young couple’s new addition. I expected it to be a baby, but it’s a sewing machine!

Complicated

It’s easy!
All one must do is
thread the bobbin, insert it under the left plate,
pull the thread up to connect with the upper needle,
thread that needle.
All set?
Now, place the fabric under the needle,
hold it straight,
then turn the wheel on the right,
and at the same time,
start peddling the treadle
back and forth,
back and forth,
push the fabric slowly through.
Be sure it stays lined up!
And don’t forget to peddle,
keep peddling.
It’s much quicker than sitting late at night
sewing the families’ clothes-
one hour for a shirt,
instead of 14 hours by hand.
This machine is a time saver,
and now you can make so many more pieces of clothing
for the family.
You won’t be able to vote for another seventy years,
but you can sew
on this complicated machine,
taking care of the family.

Linda Baie ©All Rights Reserved

***

I see that my husband’s family is not the only one with a history of working with textiles. Jone MacCulloch suggests a similar connection in this poem.

Grandmother’s Machine

Her sewing machine
a time
of spiritual contemplation

Her sewing machine
after
the household chores

Her sewing machine
creating
smocks, dresses, and aprons

Her sewing machine
rhythmic
like a rocking horse

Her sewing machine
quiet
with untold stories

© 2016 Jone Rush MacCulloch all rights reserved

***

Here’s an acrostic poem from Jessica Bigi. I like the short lines, which mimic the rhythm of the sewing machine.

Old Fashion Sewing

O val bobbin
L icorice black machine
D ainty stitching

F ancy seamstress
A djustable stitching
S ewing threads
H emming cloth
I nvisible seams
O ld fashion
N eedle thread

S imple sewing
E arth friendly
W inding wheel
I nventive sewing
N ever easy
G randmother’s stories

***

Thanks again to Matt Forrest Esenwine for contributing our found object of the day. Here is his response poem.

The Old Clothes Trunk

Each piece still brings me back,
when school bells used to ring.
Each patch still seems to ache;
each stitch still seems to sing.

– © 2016, Matt Forrest Esenwine, all rights reserved

***

Like Matt, and many of us who wrote today, Donna Smith connects fabric with the past.

Dresses

My grandmother and aunt were seamstresses
Managing a dress factory
Where I would go some days and see
Fabric piled high and in pieces
Ready to stitch together
Women sat at sewing stations
A bin on each side
With “piecework” they would
Sew together and
Place in the next basket
For the next woman to add
Another piece
And it skipped and zipped down the line
Woman to woman
Until
Like magic
A dress appeared
To be shuffled off to the dress shop
And bought by someone
Who never thought about
All the pieces of this puzzle dress
And how it magically came together –
Maybe that is why
My favorite scene in Cinderella
Has always been the assembly of her dress
Animal by animal
Bird by bird
Cutting
Sewing
Draping
Until
Like magic
A dress appears.

©2016, Donna JT Smith, all rights reserved

***

I was away during Carol Varsalona’s recent chat, but I hope some of you were able to participate. You can read more at her blog. Carol says, “Day 21 finally finished after the #ISTELitChat on the power of poetry that I guest moderated with Laura Purdie Salas. The link to my poem post ishttp://beyondliteracylink.blogspot.com/2016/02/i-remember-it-well.html.”

There is a time gone by.
I remember it well.
Nonnie’s pride and joy
my charmed hiding place
its silent wheel in idle repose-
Nonnie’s watchful eye
my pitter patter glee
its treasures stored-
Nonnie’s small round bobbins
my tiny hands examining
its threads of many colors-
Nonnie’s love for child
my love for Nonnie’s hands
its shiny cabinetry-
Nonnie talking gently
my gleeful spirit
its busy wheel in idle repose-

There is a time gone by.
I remember it well.
Her hands cradled mine
my hands longing to touch all she owned
its up-down- sing song motion

There is a time gone by.
I remember it well.
The dream to peddle
what could not be
for a little one’s hands.
Years later
mother owned her own
I learned
it was loved.

Generations passed.
Great-grandchild
owned her own machine
its needle busily moving again.

Nonnie passed.
Mother passed.
Sewing machine lives on.

©Carol Varsalona, 2016

***

Charles Waters uses the sewing machine as a metaphor for family in this poem.

Home Remedy
By Charles Waters

Grandma stitches up
each rip in my soul
with gentle hugs,
homemade banana
bread, and a kiss on
the cheek.

***

Catherine Flynn is blogging alongside us today. You can read her beautiful poem/memory at this post.

***

After a weekend visit with family, I’ve fallen behind on my own responses. I hope to catch up soon. People continue to send in work, so I hope you will go back and read poems that have been added to the earlier posts.

Those of you who have been writing along with me in February over the years know that this began as a pay it forward project in 2013. Tomorrow is my birthday, and my gift to you all is the last set of FOUND OBJECTS. It’s leap year, so we have eight objects to go.

There are two guest hosts on three days this week. Thank you to Jan Godown Annino at Bookseed Studio (Tuesday — Day 23 and Sunday, 2/28) and Mike Ratcliffe — who contributed the deer skull prompt — at Michael Ratcliffe’s Poetry (Poetry Friday, Day 26) for helping out.

Ready, writers?

_MG_5477

DAY 22 PROMPT contributed by Buffy Silverman (February 22)

DSCN2011

DAY 23 PROMPT contributed by Jan Godown Annino (February 23 at BOOKSEED STUDIO)

106

DAY 24 PROMPT contributed by Matt Forrest Esenwine (February 24)

Hawaii 088

DAY 25 PROMPT contributed by Laura Shovan (February 25)

IMG_3911

DAY 26 PROMPT contributed by Jessica Bigi (February 26 at MICHAEL RATCLIFFE’S POETRY)

IMG_7328

DAY 27 PROMPT contributed by Buffy Silverman (February 27)

IMG_2204

DAY 28 PROMPT contributed by Mary Lee Hahn (February 28 at BOOKSEED STUDIO)

 

dmayrTruck

DAY 29 PROMPT contributed by Diane Mayr (February 29) and we are done!!

Leave your writing in the blog comments (feel free to post a poem or response in the comments of any project-related post). Be sure to note which day/prompt your poem or prose short goes with so I can post it on the correct day. Send in your writing ANY TIME — early, late. As long as I receive it by February 29, it will be posted along with the object of the day.

Perfect attendance is not a requirement of this project. Write and share your work as often as you like, even if it’s only once. The goal is to practice and share, not to polish, and certainly not to aim for perfection.

Interested in what we’ve written so far? Here are links to this week’s poems:

Sunday, February 14
FOUND OBJECT: Hot Potato
Poems by: Violet Nesdoly, Jessica Bigi, Laura Shovan, Carol Varsalona, Heidi Mordhorst, Diane Mayr, Linda Baie, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Mary Lee Hahn, Donna Smith, Charles Waters, Molly Hogan.

Note: You will find links to all of  the Week 1 and Week 2 poems at this post.

Monday, February 15 at My Juicy Little Universe
FOUND OBJECT: Coffee Mug
Poems by: Jessica Bigi, Matt Forrest Esenwine, Catherine Flynn, Laura Shovan, Mary Lee Hahn, Heidi Mordhorst, Diane Mayr, Buffy Silverman, Carol Varsalona, Linda Baie, Donna Smith, Julieanne Harmatz, Jone Rush  MacCulloch, Charles Waters.

Tuesday, February 16
FOUND OBJECT: Sculpture
Poems by: Victoria Costa, Jessica Bigi, Laura Shovan, Carol Varsalona, Mary Lee Hahn, Donna Smith, Catherine Flynn, Diane Mayr, Linda Baie, Robyn Hood Black, Buffy Silverman, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Charles Waters.

Wednesday, February 17 at Mainely Write
FOUND OBJECT: Hot  Pink Sandal
Poems by: Diane Mayr, Jessica Bigi, Carol Varsalona, Linda Baie, Catherine Flynn, Mary Lee Hahn, Buffy Silverman, Donna Smith, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Laura Shovan, Heidi Mordhorst, Margaret Simon, Charles Waters.

Thursday, February 18
FOUND OBJECT: “Typewriter Eraser, Scale X” Sculpture
Poems by: Jessica Bigi, Diane Mayr, Donna Smith, Carol Varsalona, Mary Lee Hahn, Linda Baie, Catherine Flynn, Margaret Simon, Laura Shovan, Matt Forrest Esenwine, Charles Water, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Buffy Silverman.

Friday, February 19
FOUND OBJECT: Deer Skull
Poems by: Mary Lee Hahn, Jessica Bigi, Donna Smith, Linda Baie, Matt Forrest Esenwine, Patricia VanAmburg, Charles Waters, Carol Varsalona, Heather Meloche, Laura Shovan.

Saturday, February 20 at Deowriter
FOUND OBJECT: Horse Figurine
Poems by: Donna Smith, Jessica Bigi, Jone MacCulloch, Margaret Simon, Linda Baie, Carol Varsalona, Charles Waters, Jone Rush MacCulloch.