Blog
Saturday, 13 February 2016

It’s Day 13 of our 2016 daily write-in. This year’s theme is FOUND OBJECTS. We have a new writing prompt for every day in February.

For those of you who are new to my blog, please read my introductory post about the February daily write-in. You’ll find more information and all of the Week 2 FOUND OBJECT prompts at this post.

We’re almost at the mid-way point! The project has grown in both participants and in poems produced this year. Tomorrow, along with the Week 3 prompts, I will share some early project statistics with you.

Important reminder: I can only take contributions left in the comments. Unless you have an art element that must be emailed, please leave your poems here, marked with the day, so I know which object you are writing in response to. I’m thrilled that so many people are participating this year, but I’m unable to keep track of poems sent in by email. Thanks for understanding!

baieFOUND: Sculpture? Skelton?

When Linda Baie of the blog Teacher Dance sent in this object, I knew I had to include it.

As you know by now, I don’t ask for information on the objects. Sometimes the contributor identifies what’s in the picture. This was not one of those times.

I have very little idea of what this object might be. I’m excited to hear what everyone makes of it!

It makes me happy when I hear that the Found Object of the day took someone down an unexpected path. Diane Mayr wrote in, “The object looked to me to be a seed pod, and when I was researching seed pods, I found the Jimson weed.  Wikipedia had an excerpt from The History and Present State of Virginia (1705) in its article on Jimson weed.  I ‘borrowed’ it for this poem.”

Psychedelic Jamestown, 1676: A Found Poem
By Diane Mayr

An early plant
gather’d very young
for a boil’d salad
by some of the soldiers
ate plentifully of it.

The effect of which
was a very pleasant comedy.
They turned natural fools.

One would blow up
a feather in the air.
Another would dart
straws at it with much fury.

And another, stark naked,
was sitting up in a corner
like a monkey, grinning.

A fourth would fondly kiss
and paw his companions
with a countenance
more antic than any
in a Dutch droll.

A thousand such simple
tricks they played
and after eleven days
returned themselves again
not remembering any
thing that had passed.

***

I also guessed at what the object might be and ended up leaning on information from an article in my poem. My response is 75% found poem. The last four lines are my own addition.

Found Poem
Pufferfish: National Geographic Kids
By Laura Shovan

These clumsy
swimmers
fill their elastic
stomachs
with water,
blow them
selves up-
several times
normal size.
Imagine seeing
a trick like that
right before
your hungry eyes.

***

Jessica Bigi’s poem, along with adorable art, made me laugh out loud. I didn’t “see” this when I looked at our Found Object, but of course it could be…

IMG_1881

DAY 13 art and poem by Jessica Bigi.

Aunty
loved
sewing.
She
sewed
all year
long.
She sewed
till
that day
she saw
her
pincushion
running
after
her.

***

Another found poem?! We were really searching for information on today’s object.
Margaret Simon writes, “I know from my research that the picture is not a porcupine, but it sure looks like one.  I played with a found poem today.  I took the text of a Wonderopolis article, copied it into Word, crossed out word, and rewrote a final draft to revise.  I enjoyed the process.  Again, thanks for this invitation to play with poetry every day.”
porcupinePorcupine Found Poem for Two Voices
Love animals?
Give them a hug.
A porcupine?
What’s the big deal?
Sharp quills!
The prickliest!
Quill pigs Quill pigs
Like arrows,
quills detach.
Tiny needles
to pierce to pierce
an important lesson
from a porcupine–
Don’t touch! Don’t touch!
by Margaret Simon
Found from Wonderopolis “Can Porcupines Shoot Their Quills?”
***
And here is our object contributor, Linda Baie, with her response. Such fun wordplay in this poem.

Close Encounters – Advice?

And if you know a puffer fish
at times, they make a ball.
They float away from danger,
quite the smartest act of all.

No one can imagine hidden
in the amazing moon-like puff,
is a prickle that more than tickles
and you’ll soon be feeling rough.

Don’t take a bite or lickle it.
It’ll stop your taste of any dish.
And you certainly cannot tickle it,
the pretty prickle puffer fish.

Linda Baie ©All Rights Reserved

***

More play with form! Mary Lee Hahn has what is sometimes called a “counting out” rhyme, a form that hearkens back to schoolyard games.

Jumprope Rhyme

sticker
pricker
porcupine
burr

spiney
tiney
pokery
fur

seed-head
skeleton
sculpture
fish

never want to
meet you
or find you
in my dish

©Mary Lee Hahn, 2016

***

Donna Smith says, “Just started listing all the words to go with spiny – no clue what it was, but that was okay. And since my maiden name is on the prickly, spiny list… I wrote that out, too!” What a clever, creative response to our found object!

A Pointed Remark

Ah, looks like a spiny problem –
A prickly situation!
I bristled when I heard the barbs
With spinous insinuation.

A piercingly sharp comment –
Painful thorn in my side;
It’s best to dodge the scratches;
Avoid the burrs of the snide.

@Donna J Thistle Smith, all rights reserved

***

Charles Waters’ poem makes a nice pairing with Donna’s response for today.

CACTUS
By Charles Waters

Green with envy,
your needle point prickliness
hides the ugliness you
feel inside yourself.

***

Please visit Carol Varsalona’s blog Beyond LiteracyLink for a full post about her process in drafting today’s poem.

Prickly Pal
looking at me,
what noticings
do I see?
-wooden carving
-round hole on side
-sharpened quills
-big open eyed
Will you join me
for a feast
at my table,
you woodland beast?
But wait, you are not
a friendly guest
your sharpened edges
would prick my chest.
©CVarsalona, 2016

***

Catherine Flynn took two of our guesses and combined them into one poem.

“Defense Mechanism”
By Catherine Flynn

Instead of blending
into the background, melting
out of sight, pufferfish shout

“BOO!”

Ballooning, tripling
in size, drawing
their swords, warning

“STAY AWAY!”

Porcupine of the sea.

***

We had some funny poems today. From the first line of Jone MacCulloch’s poem, I was smiling along with our object.

Oh hedgie
you prickly little rascal
I want to hold you
in my hands
but
those poky spikes
keep me away

Who made you?
Why do you smile?
Were you carve from one piece?
What secrets do you keep?

© 2016 Jone Rush MacCulloch all rights reserved

***

diane

DAY 14 FOUND OBJECT PROMPT

See you tomorrow for Day 14 and the Week 3 FOUND OBJECTS.

Interested in what we’ve written so far? Here are links to this week’s poems:

Sunday, February 7
FOUND OBJECT: Blood Letting Knife
Poems by: Diane Mayr, Jessica Bigi, Laura Shovan, Catherine Flynn, Linda Baie, Molly Hogan, Carol Varsalona, Mary Lee Hahn, Matt Forrest Esenwine.

Note: You will find links to all of  the Week 1 poems at this post.

Monday, February 8
FOUND OBJECT: SCULPTURE IN THE WOODS
Poems by: Laura Shovan, Jessica Bigi, Heidi Mordhorst, Carol Varsalona, Linda Baie, Margaret Simon, Donna Smith, Diane Mayr, Joanne R. Polner, Kay McGriff, Molly Hogan, Mary Lee Hahn, Catherine Flynn, Jone Rush MacCulloch.

Tuesday, February 9
FOUND OBJECT: TIRE TRACKS IN SNOW
Poems by: Molly Hogan, Jessica Bigi, Linda Baie, Violet Nesdoly, Carol Varsalona, Mary Lee Hahn, Donna Smith, Laura Shovan, Diane Mayr, Jone Rush MacCulloch, Catherine Flynn, Kay McGiff, Charles Waters.

Wednesday, February 10 at Reflections on the Teche
FOUND OBJECT: LOTUS PODS
Poems by: Diane Mayr, Patricia VanAmburg, Jessica Bigi, Molly Hogan, Laura Shovan, Charles Waters, Buffy Silverman, Catherine Flynn, Linda Baie, Carol Varsalona, Violet Nesdoly, Heidi Mordhorst, Donna Smith, Mary Lee Hahn, Margaret Simon.

Thursday, February 11
FOUND OBJECT: WALNUT DOLL
Poems by: Diane Mayr, Carol Varsalona, Laura Shovan, Linda Baie, Violet Nesdoly, Donna Smith, Jessica Bigi, Mary Lee Hahn, Matt Forrest Esenwine, Margaret Simon.

Friday, February 12
FOUND OBJECT: CREAM? MERINGUE?
Poems by: Patricia VanAmburg, Diane Mayr, Jessica Bigi, Margaret Simon, Mary Lee Hahn, Donna Smith, Linda Baie, Carol Varsalona,  Matt Forrest Esenwine, Laura Shovan, Heidi Mordhorst.

25 responses to “2016 Found Object Poem Project: Day 13”

  1. Diane Mayr says:

    Amazing responses! I’m glad I’m not the only person to find a poem in my research, but not the right answer to my question: what is it?

  2. Jessica Bigi says:

    it is a puff fish I know this but wasn’t sour if it was real or hand made but I just couldn’t resist making it a monster pincushions Everyone’s pomes are so wonderful and so different I have been enjoying reading them this past two cant what for the new week of writing and pic

  3. I tried, I really did–but for some reason this just creeped me out too much to write about. I should have gone with my first instinct and written not TO it but AWAY from it!

  4. Donna Smith says:

    Day 13

    A Pointed Remark

    Ah, looks like a spiny problem –
    A prickly situation!
    I bristled when I heard the barbs
    With spinous insinuation.

    A piercingly sharp comment –
    Painful thorn in my side;
    It’s best to dodge the scratches;
    Avoid the burrs of the snide.

    @Donna J Thistle Smith, all rights reserved

    Just started listing all the words to go with spiny – no clue what it was, but that was okay. And since my maiden name is on the prickly, spiny list… I wrote that out, too!

  5. Linda Baie says:

    Wonderful reactions, but it is indeed a puffer fish skeleton I found on the beach of the Sea of Cortez long ago. Jessica, love that pincushion response, and everyone else’s too. I had to do more research too, but didn’t think of a found poem, clever. And the connection to a porcupine is right, isn’t it? The only way to pick this up is to grip it with fingers through the eye holes.

  6. Laura, after writing my post I see that today’s object was really a fish. I toyed with that idea but kept going back to the wooden object being a porcupine carving. Since I took the stance of a student who was befuddled I wrote a draft that needs work. But isn’t that what writing should really be, a work in progress until it finds its proper word weaving? My post and draft are at http://beyondliteracylink.blogspot.com/2016/02/unusual-digital-prompt.html. I humbly submit this in light of the wonderful writing from each member of the group.

    Shortcut to the poem:

    Prickly Pal
    looking at me,
    what noticings
    do I see?
    -wooden carving
    -round hole on side
    -sharpened quills
    -big open eyed
    Will you join me
    for a feast
    at my table,
    you woodland beast?
    But wait, you are not
    a friendly guest
    your sharpened edges
    would prick my chest.
    ©CVarsalona, 2016

  7. Violet N. says:

    I puzzled over the day 13 photo. I thought along the same lines as Diane, thinking it was some kind of seed pod. Wonderful poems came out of the mystery.

    Here’s my poem for DAY 14. I tried to make it Valentine-ish.

    Sonnet to a Potato
    (with apologies to Elizabeth Barrett Browning)

    How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
    I love thee boiled, peel-mashed, deep fried as chips
    in gravy drowned, sweet, baked, spiced hot with dips.
    I laud thee for thy subterranean days,
    thy secret growth all hidden from sun’s rays.
    Fair starchy flesh thou’rt comfort to my lips.
    Thy calories they fortify my hips.
    Sweet staple nightshade fruit, I give thee praise
    for skin of white or yellow, russet, red
    for Yukon Gold, Kerr’s pink, purple or blue.
    Thou giv’st thyself in pancakes, latkes, bread
    skins, salads, hash browns, scallops, soup and stew.
    Though sometimes named tater or spud instead
    To thee, Potato, this sonnet is due!

    ~ Violet Nesdoly

  8. I’m in awe of all these poems and the poets who created them! Here is my Day 13 contribution:

    “Defense Mechanism”

    Instead of blending
    into the background, melting
    out of sight, pufferfish shout

    “BOO!”

    Ballooning, tripling
    in size, drawing
    their swords, warning

    “STAY AWAY!”

    Porcupine of the sea.

  9. Jessica Bigi says:

    DAY 14 By Jessica Bigi
    Loaded Back Potato

    L icks
    O lives
    A vocados
    D ill
    E ndive
    D elouses

    B uttery Broccoli Beckon
    A vocados
    C heater Chees Chilly
    K ael

    P otato
    O nions
    T omato
    A leman foil
    T easpoon of salt
    O ven Backed Smiles

  10. Jessica Bigi says:

    Made changes use this this one

    DAY 14 By Jessica Bigi
    Loaded Back Potato

    L icks
    O lives
    A vocados
    D ill
    E ndive
    D elouses

    B uttery Broccoli Beckon
    A vocados
    K ael cheesy chilly
    E ndives
    D elouses

    P otato
    O nions
    T omato
    A leman foil
    T easpoon of salt
    O ven Backed

  11. Laura, I decided to satisfy my inner cravings while the house is quiet so created digital compositions. The link to the Day 14 comfort food poem is at http://beyondliteracylink.blogspot.com/2016/02/indulging-inner-cravings.html (Indulging Inner Cravings).

    The Shortcut to the Poem follows:

    Pierced by arrows of love
    filled to the brim
    a salty masterpiece-
    comfort food
    on a wintry day.

    I also would like to invite the bloggers of this community to the ISTELitChat next Sunday night at 9pm EST. I will be guest moderating the chat. The topic is the Power of Poetry. I know that this group of writers have powerful voices that should be heard via the chat.

    Happy Valentine’s Day!

  12. Day 14

    Loaded Language

    “Does this potato come with any toppings?”
    “Lady, that’s a loaded question.”

    “Whoa, that baked potato must be loaded!
    Look at his white stretch limo!”

    “Get a load of Baked Potato–
    she thinks she’s so fancy in her cream-colored coat,
    butter pat hat and her chives-and-cheese
    statement necklace.”

    “Baked Potato’s been down at Benny’s Bar & Grill all night.”
    “Yep, he’ll be heading home loaded again…”

    © Heidi Mordhorst 2016

  13. Linda Baie says:

    I guess it’s the times that made me go the way I did, a little funny, a little sad.

    Society Woe – Mistaken Identity

    They heard some words about
    a potato loaded.
    The lady at the back screamed out, so loud.
    He said ‘twas from the kiosk at the corner,”
    but all he felt was turmoil from the crowd.

    Again, he mentioned “loaded” to the people.
    This time, they froze, raised hands high in the air.
    He laughed and shouted, “Wait, you’re all misguided;
    this is a tater, not a shooter. Don’t despair.

    His over-loaded, steaming baked potato
    cheered those who had felt foolish and mistaken.
    “Whew!” they answered, then asked about the butter,
    then sour cream, the shredded cheese and bacon.

    He answered this by pulling out his package
    The odor swirled, and everyone cried “MORE”!
    People need to listen well to others,
    especially to a stranger at the door.
    Linda Baie ©All Rights Reserved

  14. I didn’t research but it doesn’t surprise me that it’s a seed pod. Here’s mine: https://deowriter.wordpress.com/2016/02/14/found-objects-poetry-challenge-day-13/

  15. Donna Smith says:

    Day 14

    Ode to a Loaded Potato

    Oh, potato,
    humble one,
    Our relationship
    Is over-done;
    I cannot have
    Another taste
    If I want to still
    Reduce my waist.
    And so baked friend
    I say to you
    A fond farewell –
    So long, adieu.
    Maybe someday,
    When I am able,
    With rekindled love
    And reset table
    I will indulge with
    Sour cream,
    Crisp bacon bits
    And cheesy stream.
    But for now
    My love must wait;
    I flirt with celery
    On my plate.

  16. […] February 13 FOUND OBJECT: PUFFER FISH SKELETON Poems by: Diane Mayr, Laura Shovan, Jessica Bigi, Margaret Simon, Linda Baie, Mary Lee Hahn, Donna […]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Laura Shovan

Laura Shovan is the author of the award-winning middle grade novel, The Last Fifth Grade of Emerson Elementary. Her second book, Takedown, is a Junior Library Guild and PJ Our Way selection. Look for A Place at the Table, co-written with Saadia Faruqi, in 2020. Laura is a poet-in-the-schools Maryland.

Learn More

Find something on Laura’s Bookshelf:

Categories

Archives

Follow me on Twitter

Follow me on Goodreads