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Saturday, 20 February 2016

Hello, Found Object Poets. I am prancing around in New Jersey today while another blogger takes over today’s hosting duties.

20150403_172032-3FOUND: Horse Figurine

You will find the Day 20Found Object Poem Project post at Jone Rush MacCulloch’s blog, Deowriter. Thank you for hosting while I’m visiting with family, Jone!

 

 

 

 

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DAY 21 FOUND OBJECT PROMPT (February 21)

I’ll see you back here (late!) tomorrow for Day 21 and the last set of writing prompts. You can leave your Day 20 responses at this post or in the comments at Jone’s blog.

 

9 responses to “2016 Found Object Poem Project: Day 20”

  1. Jessica Bigi says:

    Day 20

    Story by Jessica Bigi

    Mysteries (Coin)-as in money

    I can only image how it
    Ended up on our sidewalk
    Spooked wagon wells traveling
    From hundreds of years ago
    At terrors chest from a ship that
    Sailed an enchant river
    As the sun hit the round object
    A silvery shine cote my eyes
    I ran over to where it layer
    Reached down and grabbed it
    With my fingers rusty
    Form age it felt like sandpaper
    Where did it come from I thought
    As I ran to granddads house with my fond
    Thresher like gold in my hand
    How could of dropped it ?
    Some ancient Egyptian king?
    Or someone that studies dinosaurs?
    A queen of some royal city?
    All I know was it was mine now
    Granddad Look what I found
    On our sidewalk
    This is very old he said as
    He opened up a big book of rai cones
    Do you think it is worth a
    Lot of money I ask
    Son he said it is so rai that I
    Can’t find it in my book
    We both look at it through
    His Magen fine glass
    Look at this granddad said
    On one side of the coin
    It sad free ride
    And on the other side of
    The coin was a horse
    Granddad just smile ah
    I remembered these he
    as he ran up stars I’ll be back he sad
    When he got back
    he was hold a dusty box
    I still have a few of these coins he sad
    Son get your coat
    Where are we going granddad
    I t’s a spritzer he sad
    We got in to his car
    It seemed like we drove forever
    Were her son this place has so
    Many happy mummeries he sad
    We had driven to a park that
    I have never seen before
    What does this park have to do
    with my coin I aske ?
    we was a but as granddad told
    me that this is where he met
    my grandmother his I tear up
    when before us should this beautiful old caracal
    granddads smiled I think it takes
    quarters now but when I was
    younger these tokens like the
    one you found wound pay for the ride
    when you grandmother and I were
    tanagers we spent Meany
    summer and fall day riding on
    the magical horses
    I like the one that look like a lion
    After that day grandad brought
    me back the caracal
    now that I am older I Bering my
    Own wife and druthers
    And I have such a beautiful magical story
    that all starts coin with
    A hours on one sit
    What I wonderful trouser
    I found I think

    I will keep it

  2. […] at Laura Shovan’s blog, Jessica Bigi left this story […]

  3. Jessica Bigi says:

    not now but when you have time could swich this creted verison of day 20 poem with the one that wasent thank you

    • Mysteries (Coin)-as in money
    I can only imagine how it ended up on our sidewalk. Spoked wagon wheels traveling from hundreds of years ago. A treasure chest from a ship that sailed an enchanted river. As the sun hit the round object A silvery shine caught my eyes. I ran over to where it lay, reached down and grabbed it with my fingers. Rusty from age it felt like sandpaper. Where did it come from? I thought as I ran to Granddad’s house with my found treasure like gold in my hand. Who could have dropped it? Some ancient Egyptian king? Or someone that studies dinosaurs? A queen of some royal city? All I know was it was mine now. “Granddad! Look what I found on our sidewalk.”
    “This is very old,”he said as he opened up a big book of rare coins.
    “Do you think it is worth a lot of money?” I asked.
    “Son,” he said, “It is so rare that I can’t find it in my book.”
    We both looked at it through his magnifying glass.
    “Look at this!” granddad said. On one side of the coin it said free ride. And on the other side of the coin was a horse. Granddad just smiled. “Ah, I remembered these,” he said as he ran upstairs. “I’ll be back,” he said. When he got back he was holding a dusty box. “I still have a few of these coins,” he said. “Son get your coat.”
    “Where are we going granddad?”
    “It’s a surprise,” he said. We got into his car. It seemed like we drove forever. “Where her son this place has so many happy memories,” he said. We had driven to a park that I have never seen before.
    “What does this park have to do with my coin?” I asked. Granddad told me that this is where he met my grandmother. His eyes tear up when before us should this beautiful old carousel. Granddad smiled. “I think it takes quarters now but when I was younger these tokens like the one you found would pay for the ride. When your grandmother and I were teenagers we spent many summer and fall day riding on the magical horses. I liked the one that looked like a lion.”
    After that day Granddad brought me back to the carousel. Now that I am older I bring my own wife and others. And I have such a beautiful magical story that all starts with a coin with a hours on one side. What a wonderful treasure I found I think.

  4. Donna Smith says:

    Laura, I have submitted to Days 1-4 on those day’s comments. I wasn’t sure if that was the right way to add old ones or not. If you need them up on a current page, just let me know and I’ll move them! Thanks!
    I’ll let you know if and when I get the rest put up.

  5. Linda Baie says:

    Day 21

    Complicated

    It’s easy!
    All one must do is
    thread the bobbin, insert it under the left plate,
    pull the thread up to connect with the upper needle,
    thread that needle.
    All set?
    Now, place the fabric under the needle,
    hold it straight,
    then turn the wheel on the right,
    and at the same time,
    start peddling the treadle
    back and forth,
    back and forth,
    push the fabric slowly through.
    Be sure it stays lined up!
    And don’t forget to peddle,
    keep peddling.
    It’s much quicker than sitting late at night
    sewing the families’ clothes-
    one hour for a shirt,
    instead of 14 hours by hand.
    This machine is a time saver,
    and now you can make so many more pieces of clothing
    for the family.
    You won’t be able to vote for another seventy years,
    but you can sew
    on this complicated machine,
    taking care of the family.
    Linda Baie ©All Rights Reserved

  6. Here’s for Day 21:
    Grandmother’s Machine

    Her sewing machine
    a time
    of spiritual contemplation

    Her sewing machine
    after
    the household chores

    Her sewing machine
    creating
    smocks, dresses, and aprons

    Her sewing machine
    rhythmic
    like a rocking horse

    Her sewing machine
    quiet
    now with secrets

    © 2016 Jone Rush MacCulloch all rights reserved

  7. REVISED….decided to change the last stanza.
    Grandmother’s Machine

    Her sewing machine
    a time
    of spiritual contemplation

    Her sewing machine
    after
    the household chores

    Her sewing machine
    creating
    smocks, dresses, and aprons

    Her sewing machine
    rhythmic
    like a rocking horse

    Her sewing machine
    quiet
    with untold stories

    © 2016 Jone Rush MacCulloch all rights reserved

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Laura Shovan

Laura Shovan is the author of the award-winning middle grade novel, The Last Fifth Grade of Emerson Elementary. Her second book, Takedown, is a Junior Library Guild and PJ Our Way selection. Look for A Place at the Table, co-written with Saadia Faruqi, in 2020. Laura is a poet-in-the-schools Maryland.

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